header icons
header icons
Featured Articles

Do You Really See the Face of Jesus in the Poor At the Houston Catholic Worker?

This article was first published in the Houston Catholic Worker in February 1986. It was a beautiful day with the early morning sun streaming through the stained glass windows and glancing off the faces of the packed congregation. Everything and everybody seemed so bright and shiny. Even I felt that way, used clothing and all…. continue reading

Overflowing Support Will Carry Mark Zwick’s Work At Casa Juan Diego Into the Future

During the days and weeks after Mark died on November 18, many have sent their condolences, their prayers and notice of having Masses said for him or come to visit and personally express their gratitude for Mark’s life.  Many, many came to his wake and his funeral at St. Anne’s. Sixteen priests came to celebrate… continue reading

Mark Zwick: “I Live at Casa Juan Diego”

by Zeidy Harris

Stephen has been an essential part of Casa Juan Diego since the very beginning, maintaining our large mailing list, printing and sorting labels and working with the guests of our men’s house in preparing each mailing of the paper, as well as working with the accounting. One of the last times I spoke with Mark… continue reading

“If We Had Any Guts We’d Start a Catholic Worker House”: Reflections at the Vigil Service for Mark Zwick

mark zwick 2

   We are here to celebrate the life of Mark Zwick and his remarkable example of servant leadership.  Mark laid the foundation for Casa Juan Diego which has fed and sheltered tens of thousands of people over the last 36 years.  He founded a newspaper and with his wife Louise coauthored books illuminating the pilgrimage… continue reading

Mark Zwick, a Missionary of Mercy

“Mark Zwick passed away at the conclusion of the Jubilee Year of Mercy,” said Maryknoll Father Rafael Dávila, “Mark died as he lived—as a missionary of mercy.” Preaching in both Spanish and English at Mark’s funeral Mass on November 22, 2016 at St. Anne’s Church in Houston, Texas, Father Dávila began by describing the meaning… continue reading

The Crowd Parted When Mark Zwick Arrived in His Wheel Chair

Mark Zwick

As his health declined, Mark Zwick was no longer able to walk the short distance to visit all the Catholic Worker houses that he and his wife, Louise founded. It was important to him that he still be connected to the work, however, so for a time he was driven by car and later pushed… continue reading

Why Are We Called Catholic Worker? On the Origins of the Catholic Worker Movement

The Houston Catholic Worker is rejected by some because of its name. Some reject it because of the word “Catholic.” Others because of the word “Worker”. Others say they would never pick up a paper with such a name. The word “Houston” is not a problem: the paper is written for the people of Texas… continue reading

Stepping Out Of the Boat At Casa Juan Diego

by Angel Valdez

Joanna was a Catholic Worker at Casa Juan Diego last year. She has recently joined the Carmelite Sisters of the Most Sacred Heart of Los Angeles. My time as an active Catholic Worker at Casa Juan Diego drew to a close in the middle of May, and I had a speech to prepare. It’s a… continue reading

Communion: A New Easy Essay

1.  The Catechism of the Catholic Church tells us in teaching 1397 that the Eucharist commits us to the poor. 2.  Dorothy quoted Fr. Lacouture: “If we cannot see Jesus in the poor man, we surely cannot see Him under the poverty-stricken veils of bread.” 3.  In both the Mass and in sharing a meal with a poor… continue reading

Called to Be Saints: John Hugo, the Catholic Worker, and a Theology of Radical Christianity

called_to_be_saints

Benjamin T. Peters. Called to Be Saints: John Hugo, the Catholic Worker, and a Theology of Radical Christianity. Milwaukee: Marquette University Press, 2016, 586 p. Reviewed by Mark and Louise Zwick In this landmark study of Fr. John Hugo and the retreat that had a profound influence on Dorothy Day, Benjamin Peters argues that Hugo’s… continue reading