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Featured Articles

The Crowd Parted When Mark Zwick Arrived in His Wheel Chair

As his health declined, Mark Zwick was no longer able to walk the short distance to visit all the Catholic Worker houses that he and his wife, Louise founded. It was important to him that he still be connected to the work, however, so for a time he was driven by car and later pushed… continue reading

Why Are We Called Catholic Worker? On the Origins of the Catholic Worker Movement

The Houston Catholic Worker is rejected by some because of its name. Some reject it because of the word “Catholic.” Others because of the word “Worker”. Others say they would never pick up a paper with such a name. The word “Houston” is not a problem: the paper is written for the people of Texas… continue reading

Stepping Out Of the Boat At Casa Juan Diego

Joanna was a Catholic Worker at Casa Juan Diego last year. She has recently joined the Carmelite Sisters of the Most Sacred Heart of Los Angeles. My time as an active Catholic Worker at Casa Juan Diego drew to a close in the middle of May, and I had a speech to prepare. It’s a… continue reading

Communion: A New Easy Essay

1.  The Catechism of the Catholic Church tells us in teaching 1397 that the Eucharist commits us to the poor. 2.  Dorothy quoted Fr. Lacouture: “If we cannot see Jesus in the poor man, we surely cannot see Him under the poverty-stricken veils of bread.” 3.  In both the Mass and in sharing a meal with a poor… continue reading

Called to Be Saints: John Hugo, the Catholic Worker, and a Theology of Radical Christianity

Benjamin T. Peters. Called to Be Saints: John Hugo, the Catholic Worker, and a Theology of Radical Christianity. Milwaukee: Marquette University Press, 2016, 586 p. Reviewed by Mark and Louise Zwick In this landmark study of Fr. John Hugo and the retreat that had a profound influence on Dorothy Day, Benjamin Peters argues that Hugo’s… continue reading

Daniel Berrigan, SJ: Our Only Weapon Is Love

The recent death of Father Daniel Berrigan, S.J., the famous anti-war priest, reminded me of a retreat he gave in Houston well over twenty years ago. I was a brand new Catholic convert, a pacifist and a Dorothy Day admirer, full of eagerness to serve and sacrifice. Here was a priest, heavily influenced by the… continue reading

New Pastoral Letter From San Salvador: I See Violence and Strife In the City

El Salvador is again overwhelmed with violence. At Casa Juan Diego we are very aware of the critical situation for Salvadorans because of the refugees who come to our doors and tell us their stories. In response to a crisis situation in which the death toll from homicides is one of the highest in the… continue reading

Personalism in Our Daily Lives

Joanna, a graduate of Wyoming Catholic College, is a Catholic Worker at Casa Juan Diego. I came to Casa Juan Diego some months ago, and as I made the long drive from home down to Houston, Texas, I began to wonder more and more as the wheels of the car brought me closer and closer… continue reading

A Voice Crying Out In the Desert

Mark, a Catholic Worker at Casa Juan Diego, graduated from Texas A & M University. I come from a family of migrant workers. My grandparents would travel from the Texas border to Wisconsin, Montana and Wyoming during the summer months to work in the fields and work as laborers. My parents would also go up… continue reading

Rutilio Grande, SJ: Homilies and Writings

Book Review: Rutilio Grande, SJ: Homilies and Writings. Edited, Translated, and Annotated by Thomas M. Kelly. College-ville, Minnesota: Liturgical Press, 2015. Reviewed by Mark and Louise Zwick On February 13, 1977, Mark stood next to Rutilio Grande, the priest who would soon be assassinated, as he waited in the procession to begin Mass. It was… continue reading